Only In Bozeman

<

Top Winter Yellowstone Instagram Photos of 2019-2020

Posted by Visit Bozeman on Jan 7, 2020 1:30:00 PM
Visit Bozeman
Find me on:


It doesn't take much to capture Yellowstone National Park in the perfect light – it's a pretty photogenic place. But some Instagram superstars have topped even the apex of imaginable beauty. And when Jack Frost comes knocking, the winter wonderland of the world's first national park makes the perfect photo subject. Here are this year's top ten Instagram photos of Yellowstone in winter.

FIRE and Ice

This winter sunset posted by Yellowstone Forever, the park's nonprofit partner, lights up Instagram the way the sinking sun lit the sky on fire that day. The fire in the sky compliments the chilly white snow below, living proof that winter is just as vivid her

A photo posted by Yellowstone Forever (@ynpforever) on December 27, 2019

 

Discover Things to Do in Bozeman

Cold Smoke

Another goody from Yellowstone Forever, this time showing the poof of rising geyser steam catching the sun in glints and gleams. Two snow-coated trees stand watch over the geothermal feature, a snapshot of the undisturbed winter landscape in Yellowstone.

 

Jack Frost and Christmas tree.

A photo posted by Yellowstone Forever (@ynpforever) on December 25, 2019

 

some shall pass 

Posted by the park's account, this shot of roaring snowmobiles highlighted by headlights shows an often-overlooked side of winter in the park. This is your inspiration to get out there by whatever means suits you best, because our public lands—complete with rising mountains and snow-covered roads—are for everyone to enjoy.

 

The Bees Knees

Unpredictable Beehive Geyser in the Upper Geyser Basin is one you never quite know if you'll have a chance to see. It usually erupts just twice a day, and photographer Micah K (@geologicadventures) caught it mid-burst, steaming high above a blanketing of snow.

 

The SNows Knows

The NPS posted this shot of a cow moose caught in the cookie jar, powdery snow looking like powdered sugar dusting her nose. These furry critters have to work to stay cool on warm winter days because their coats are so thick and cozy.

 

Dashing through the NO.⁣ ⁣

Cold? Snow problem. Adult moose are able to withstand cold temps. Moose have a built-in solution: a super-insulated “jacket” made of fur. Long, hollow hairs and a dense, soft undercoat keep moose warm. Moose are so well insulated from the cold that winter temperatures of 23 degrees F can even make them pant. On warm winter days, some moose will lie flat in the snow to try to dissipate their body heat. Picture a snow angel maneuver but with moose hooves in the air. Yeah, that's not in the brochure. ⁣ ⁣

Image: Bull moose in deep snow eating a conifer tree at Yellowstone National Park. NPS/Jim Peaco⁣ ⁣

#FindYourPark #nationalparkservice #moose #yellowstonenationalpark #snowday

A photo posted by Yellowstone National Park (@yellowstonenps) on Dec 17, 2019

 

Just a Bit of Frosting

Yellowstone's Instagram account is always popping with photos that will wow. This ice-crusted tree is set against a white backdrop so pale you have to squint to catch the outline, a tribute to the austerity of snow-covered winter in Yellowstone.

 

Yellowstone Friends

The figure dressed in red compliments the color of the thermal feature they're walking across—safely on the boardwalk, of course. You can just feel the chill in the air as the steam rises into the sky.

 

Lily Vela: my best friend from Yellowstone.

My mom drove me out to Bozeman from Cali in May. We made a little road trip out of it and saw some of the coolest places: the Snake River, a waterfall in Idaho (it started pouring rain on us in the freezing cold), Big Sky. We got to the hotel in Billings and got in bed for the night. And I saw that this girl Lily had posted to the Facebook Yellowstone Employee page, she was in Bozeman, heading to the park the following day & seeing if anyone was there too. I was! I’m pretty shy about messaging people, but I told her I was. The next morning I woke up super early, said bye to my momma, and headed to a Starbucks in Bozeman. I walked in and met Lily for the first time. We talked, about everything, and finally finished our drinks and walked out to our cars in the rain to leave. Her and I drove from Bozeman to Gardiner together... (those Montana drivers are insane by the way, I thought cali drivers were crazy) It was super rainy most of the driver and we stuck close together. Finally we ended up in Gardiner at check-in. I was so filled with excitement, I felt like I was doing something I was made to do. Her and I met up with Kathleen, who I talked to for months over text before we got to YNP. All of us got our uniforms and then headed into the park through the North Entrance alllllll the way down to Grant Village at the South end of the park. Passing through some gorgeous views, with snow still covering the ground in places. After we made it to Grant and checked in, Lily and I ended up being roommates! We moved our stuff in and then the best few months ever began. This photo was from the Grand Prismatic Spring early in the season, before it was busy. It was so cold my eyelashes were frosted, which was pretty awesome.

Lily, you truly made the park so great. It wouldn’t have been as fun without you. We saw some amazing stuff & made so many memories. I miss you!

#yellowstonejobs #yellowstonejobscontest #yellowstonenationalpark #grandprismaticspring

A photo posted by Bailey Mora (@baileylaruemora) on November 23, 2019

 

Beautiful Bacteria?!?!

If you needed a reminder that winter isn't all pure whites and pale neutrals under a grey sky, this photo from Kristine Brunsman (@rangerkristine) is the best way to remember. See the bold rainbow of colors from the pictured thermal feature, wrapped in a white snowy scarf.

 

The rainbow of colors you see in thermal features indicate the type(s) of bacteria present and a temperature range of the water. For example, red is >165°F and usually Cyanobacteria is present, though it can also mean iron desposits.

Canon EOS 60D · EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM SLR Lens · 10mm · f/11 · ISO 100 · 1/250

#teamcanon #CanonFanPhoto #MyCanonStory #YellowstonePledge #YellowstoneForever #Yellowstone #NationalPark #NationalParks #ThatsWY #discover_wyoming #MontanaMoment #ExperienceYellowstone #YellowstoneNationalPark #NationalParkGeek #REI1440project #OptOutside #NeverStopExploring #foreverwild #FindYourPark #letsgosomewhere #adventureisoutthere #wheretofindme #postcardsfromtheworld #roamtheplanet #ourplanetdaily #StayWild #VisitTheUSA #OutdoorsUSA #NatGeoTravel #TravelTuesday

A photo posted by Kristine Brunsman (@rangerkristine) on Dec 3, 2019

 

A trip to Yellowstone in the Winter can build memories that will last a lifetime. Come find your own instagrammable views, breath-taking colors, and animal action shots in this magical place.

 

If you enjoyed this blog, take a look at some of our other related articles:

New Call-to-action 

Tags: Yellowstone National Park, Sightseeing, Day Trips